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OWASP Top 10

OWASP Top 10

Oct 5, 2012

OWASP Top 10 for 2010

On April 19, 2010 OWASP released the final version of the OWASP Top 10 for 2010, and here is the associated press release. This version was updated based on numerous comments received during the comment period after the release candidate was released in Nov. 2009.

The OWASP Top 10 Web Application Security Risks for 2010 are:

Please help us make sure every developer in the ENTIRE WORLD knows about the OWASP Top 10 by helping to spread the word!!!

As you help us spread the word, please emphasize:

  • OWASP is reaching out to developers, not just the application security community
  • The Top 10 is about managing risk, not just avoiding vulnerabilities
  • To manage these risks, organizations need an application risk management program, not just awareness training, app testing, and remediation

We need to encourage organizations to get off the penetrate and patch mentality. As Jeff Williams said in his 2009 OWASP AppSec DC Keynote: “we’ll never hack our way secure – it’s going to take a culture change” for organizations to properly address application security.

If you are interested in doing a presentation on the OWASP Top 10, please feel free to use all or parts of this:

Introduction

The OWASP Top Ten provides a powerful awareness document for web application security. The OWASP Top Ten represents a broad consensus about what the most critical web application security flaws are. Project members include a variety of security experts from around the world who have shared their expertise to produce this list. Versions of the 2007 were translated into English, French, Spanish, Japanese, Korean and Turkish and other languages. Translation efforts for the 2010 version are underway and they will be posted as they become available.

We urge all companies to adopt this awareness document within their organization and start the process of ensuring that their web applications do not contain these flaws. Adopting the OWASP Top Ten is perhaps the most effective first step towards changing the software development culture within your organization into one that produces secure code.

Versions

Stable:

2010 Translations:

2010 Release Candidate:

Old versions:

Users and Adopters

The U.S. Federal Trade Commission strongly recommends that all companies use the OWASP Top Ten and ensure that their partners do the same. In addition, the U.S. Defense Information Systems Agency (DISA) has listed the OWASP Top Ten as key best practices that should be used as part of the DoD Information Assurance Certification and Accreditation Process (DIACAP).

In the commercial market, the Payment Card Industry (PCI) standard has adopted the OWASP Top Ten, and requires (among other things) that all merchants get a security code review for all their custom code. In addition, a broad range of companies and agencies around the globe are also using the OWASP Top Ten, including:

  • A.G. Edwards
  • Bank of Newport
  • Best Software
  • British Telecom
  • Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, and Firearms (ATF)
  • Citibank
  • Cboss Internet
  • Cognizant
  • Contra Costa County, CA
  • Corillian Corporation
  • Digital Payment Technologies
  • Foundstone Strategic Security
  • HP
  • IBM Global Services
  • National Australia Bank
  • Norfolk Southern
  • OneSAS.com
  • Online Business Systems
  • Predictive Systems
  • Price Waterhouse Coopers
  • Recreational Equipment, Inc. (REI)
  • SSP Solutions
  • Samsung SDS (Korea)
  • Sempra Energy
  • Sprint
  • Sun Microsystems
  • Swiss Federal Institute of Technology
  • Symantec
  • Texas Dept of Human Services
  • The Hartford
  • Zapatec
  • ZipForm
  • …and many others

Several schools have also adopted the OWASP Top Ten as a part of their curriculum, including Michigan State University (MSU), and the University of California at San Diego (UCSD).

Several open source projects have adopted the OWASP Top Ten as part of their security audits, including:

(Source: https://www.owasp.org/index.php/Category:OWASP_Top_Ten_Project)

 

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